Rosario Hernandez regularly gardens with her grandchildren at her two Atlanta properties in the English Avenue district, about a mile from Mercedes-Benz Stadium.

 

So Hernandez, who works with Historic Westside Gardens, was alarmed when an Emory University team analyzed the soil in July 2018 and discovered it contained unsafe concentrations of lead — a potent neurotoxin that is especially dangerous to children.

The next month, a community member at a local tomato festival delivered a piece of a rock-like material from the area to Emory professor Eri Saikawa and an official with the federal Environmental Protection Agency.

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The most common source of lead exposure for children comes from paint in buildings built before 1978—the year the government banned the sale of lead-based paint. In schools, lead dust can come from disturbing lead paint during renovations, deteriorating lead paint, and lead-contaminated soil.

We surveyed schools across the U.S. on how they deal with lead paint. Among other things, we found

About a third of public school students, about 15.3 million, were in school districts that inspected for lead paint

About half the districts that inspected found lead paint.… Continue Reading . . .

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If you and your family live in an older home, your children might be at risk for lead poisoning. Lead poisoning is a serious condition that can irreversibly damage your child’s nervous system, brain and other organs. In addition to health problems, elevated levels of lead have been shown to cause learning disabilities and behavior problems that affect a child’s ability to pay attention.

Lead is a poisonous metal that is especially dangerous to babies and young children. It is most often found in lead-based paint, in dust that forms when lead-based paint is scraped, sanded or worn down through use, and in soil that becomes contaminated with peeling, lead-based paint.… Continue Reading . . .

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