Bill would require lead testing in Georgia schools

Senate Bill 29 would require schools and child care centers in Georgia to test their drinking water for lead. By Sulfur – Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=10780502

Schools and child care centers in Georgia would have to test their drinking water for lead contamination under a bill approved by the state Senate Friday.

Senate Bill 29 would require them to perform the tests and remediate any lead contamination by June 30, 2019. If lead is found, the facilities would be required to post results and a remediation plan and to provide them to parents and guardians of children as well as employees.

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11 Alive Reports on Lack of Asbestos Regulations in Georgia

Southeast Lead Paint Testing and Consulting

 


The 11Alive Investigators uncovered the state agency responsible for regulating asbestos doesn’t regularly ensure licensed inspectors are used to remove the cancer causing material.

Georgia victims and litigators say the lack of enforcement potentially puts Georgia resident’s at risk.

One them includes Dan Pearson. Like the tools on his work bench, Pearson feels like he’s getting a little rusty.
Instead of working six days a week at his Ellijay Heating and Air Conditioning Company for the past five years, he’s sidelined by a disease which will soon take his life.… Continue Reading . . .

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More DeKalb County schools test positive for lead in water

 

Lead was found in water samples at Rowland and Pleasantdale elementary schools and the Margaret Harris Comprehensive School, DeKalb County School District officials said late Monday.

The school district posted testing reports from six schools. Of those, no lead above the Environmental Protection Agency’s action level of 15 parts per billion was discovered at Evansdale and Jolly elementary schools and Coralwood Education Center.

The EPA limits lead levels to 15 parts per billion. School water fountains should not exceed lead concentrations of 1 part per billion, recommends the American Society of Pediatrics, saying even low lead levels could affect behavior and learning.

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